Terry Stevenson’s Agricultural Weblog

A blog about news and events occuring in Canadian agriculture

Crop scouting

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scoutingCRP013

In some ways it seems hard to believe that summer has actually arrived. The weather for the most part has been cool and wet in southwestern Ontario. Wheat crops are roughly a week or so away from being harvested with corn and soybean fields growing very well for the most part. 

For farmers there is no time off and one of the most important areas of concern for their corn and soybeans is “crop scouting.” Insect infestation and a wide range of plant diseases’ can devastate these crops if not caught in time and appropriate action taken. 

Crop scouting is an integral part of ensuring healthy corn and soybean plants reach full maturity, maximizing their yield potential for farmers. It is not unusual while crop scouting for a farmer to discover a weed, disease or insect which is not easily identifiable and until this is done they cannot even begin to establish a corrective course of action to eliminate the particular problem. 

Some farmers depend on outside help in scouting their fields such as an AGRIS Co-operative or Wanstead Farmers Co-operative crop specialist to assist them walking their fields looking for potential problems. Even then, they can run across a situation that requires the expertise of a professional and in southwestern Ontario our co-operatives work closely with the experts at the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus

Leading industry staff at the Ridgetown Campus like Albert Tenuta, Tracey Baute, Horst Bohner, Mike Cowbrough, Peter Johnson and Greg Stewart to name just a few, help provide a wealth of experience and research knowledge for farmers finding solutions to their crop problems. The Ridgetown Campus is again holding a very successful and well respected “Crop Diagnostic Days” on July 8th and 9th, 2009 where farmers and agricultural industry personnel can receive, as detailed on their website, “state-of-the-art training in all aspects of crop production and management.”

 Another welcome development for the agriculture industry has been a new blog to hit the internet this spring. It has been an instant hit and is called “Baute Bug Blog.com.” Tracey Baute from the University of Guelph, Ridgetown Campus is a field crop entomologist for the Ontario Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Rural Affairs. Tracey’s blog keeps everyone up to date with the latest in insect problems being identified in fields and possible solutions to deal with the infestations.  

So while farmers walk their corn and soybean fields this summer scouting for potential problems it is very reassuring for them to know that they can rely on the crop experts from the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown Campus to assist them in identifying field problems and providing solutions to help them maximize their crop yields.

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Written by terrystevenson

July 6, 2009 at 9:20 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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